Facebook Twitter Pinterest The Planalto presidential palace, a Unesco world heritage site. Photograph: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesNicolás Maduro, the leader of neighbouring Venezuela, was the subject of a botched drone attack in 2018 while addressing a rally near his presidential palace.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Italian style: in Milan last year. Photograph: Jacopo M Raule/Getty Images for GucciThe Covid case numbers are on the rise again and this month, which normally looms with a hefty weight of shows, is already a September like no other. New York and London fashion weeks are now mainly «phygital», a combination of shows with physical and digital elements. Even in physical form, we will see collections through smaller shows and private appointments. And with cases on the rise again in Italy and France, there are question marks over how the big houses will stage their shows. It’s an uneasy pull between the desire of the financial powers that be in brands to return to the «old normal» and a pushback from the creatives and designers, who now want to do things differently. Fewer collections. Less product. Better ideas that meet the needs of a changed world.

Elsewhere, lockdown created some discernible shifts in the way we dressed once we had established our WFH pattern. We developed a lopsided sartorial mode of pyjama shorts and tracksuit bottoms below the waist with something fancy and extra above, with a slick of lipstick to complete the Zoom game-face. Loungewear and teclado tfue athleisure have grown exponentially, which isn’t music to my ears (I don’t even own tracksuit bottoms), but the idea of people finding comfort in what they wear to work from home, if they can afford to, has fundamentally shifted our perceptions of who we dress for. If it’s for a smaller circle of people, as social distancing measures continue, do we dress down or up? How do we factor in the psychology of «dopamine dressing» at a time when we need to be uplifted within our more confined spaces?

Alonso has pursued victory in the Le Mans endurance race with Toyota, which he achieved in 2018 and last year, and is still intent on winning the Indy 500 to complete, alongside his F1 victory at Monaco, motor racing’s triple crown. However, he has been explicit in not ruling out a return to F1 if he believed the conditions were right.

kristinekochanski 19 November 2013 5:53pmThis comment has been chosen by Guardian staff because it contributes to the debateA rat race is for rats. We’re not rats. We’re human beings. Reject the insidious pressures in society that would blunt your critical faculties to all that is happening around you, that would caution silence in the face of injustice lest you jeopardise your chances of promotion and self-advancement.

This is how it starts, and, before you know where you are, you’re a fully paid-up member of the rat pack. The price is too high.

Jimmy Reid in 1972. More valid now than ever.

Katewashere 19 November 2013 7:05pmThis comment has been chosen by Guardian staff because it contributes to the debateGotta be Julia Gillard’s misogyny speech. Hands down the best political speech of the last ten years.

Metrópoles said officials wanted to place a 20-metre antenna on the presidential Planalto palace; a 10-metre antenna on the Alvorada presidential residence; and a six-metre antenna on the vice-presidential Jaburu residence. The antennas – reportedly designed to detect and «neutralize» drones – would be supported by diagonal cables, creating a pyramid-style effect above the stunning low-rise structures.

«Every solitary one of these aristocratic conspirators and would-be murderers claims to be an arch-patriot; every one of them insists that the war is being waged to make the world safe for democracy. What humbug! What rot! What false pretense! These autocrats, these tyrants, these red-handed robbers and murderers, the «patriots,» while the men who have the courage to stand face to face with them, speak the truth, and fight for their exploited victims—they are the disloyalists and traitors. If this be true, I want to take my place side by side with the traitors in this fight.»

Closing with:

«And now for all of us to do our duty! The clarion call is ringing in our ears and we cannot falter without being convicted of treason to ourselves and to our great cause.

Do not worry over the charge of treason to your masters, but be concerned about the treason that involves yourselves. Be true to yourself and you cannot be a traitor to any good cause on earth.

Yes, in good time we are going to sweep into power in this nation and throughout the world. We are going to destroy all enslaving and degrading capitalist institutions and re-create them as free and humanizing institutions. The world is daily changing before our eyes. The sun of capitalism is setting; the sun of socialism is rising. It is our duty to build the new nation and the free republic. We need industrial and social builders. We Socialists are the builders of the beautiful world that is to be. We are all pledged to do our part. We are inviting—aye challenging you this afternoon in the name of your own manhood and womanhood to join us and do your part.

In due time the hour will strike and this great cause triumphant—the greatest in history—will proclaim the emancipation of the working class and the brotherhood of all mankind.»

Leopold1904 19 November 2013 4:40pmThis comment has been chosen by Guardian staff because it contributes to the debateSurely Neil Kinnock’s ‘We’re all right’ speech which had me in tears.

Also inspiring is this advice on political speeches from George Plunkitt

Now, nobody ever saw me puttin’ on any style. I’m the same Plunkitt I was when I entered politics forty years ago. That is why the people of the district have confidence in me. If I went into the stylish business, even I, Plunkitt, might be thrown down in the district. That was shown pretty clearly in the senatorial fight last year. A day before the election, my enemies circulated a report that I had ordered a $10,000 automobile and a $l25 dress suit. I sent Out contradictions as fast as I could, but I wasn’t able to stamp out the infamous slander before the votin’ was over, and I suffered some at the polls. The people wouldn’t have minded much if I had been accused of robbin’ the city treasury, for they’re used to slanders of that kind in campaigns, but the automobile and the dress suit were too much for them.

Another thing that people won’t stand for is showin’ off your learnin’. That’s just puttin’ on style in another way. If you’re makin’ speeches in a campaign, talk the language the people talk. Don’t try to show how the situation is by quotin’ Shakespeare. Shakespeare was all right in his way, but he didn’t know anything about Fifteenth District politics. If you know Latin and Greek and have a hankerin’ to work them off on somebody, hire a stranger to come to your house and listen to you for a couple of hours; then go out and talk the language of the Fifteenth to the people. I know it’s an awful temptation, the hankerin’ to show off your learnin’. I’ve felt it myself, but I always resist it. I know the awful consequences.

Sidfishes 19 November 2013 5:20pmThis comment has been chosen by Guardian staff because it contributes to the debateI’m as lefty as the come – but this speech by Churchill never fails to make the hairs on the back of neck stand up…